/ L E T T E R I N G  S E R V I C E S /


* wordMarks *

A good wordmark is pivotal in the establishment of a company or product name. It is usually wise to place more emphasis on the presentation of the wordmark than on a graphic or abstract logo -at least until a strong association between the name and logo has been established. A wordmark should be appropriate, original and distinctive or, to use design-speak, "ownable". The latter is often neglected in favour of the use of mass-produced typeface resulting in a weaker branding. Usually, the only way to achieve a strong wordmark which you can call your own is to customise the typesetting or do it by hand. Some good South African examples of the latter are the Appletizer, Bokomo-Weetbix, Vinolia, and Safmarine wordmarks. Of course, the best known hand-drawn wordmark world-wide is Coca-Cola.

The old BLUES Cafe signeage along with one of my proposals. The old design had a boring shape which didn't fit, looked too busy, had extremely poor lettering and confused the existing BLUES branding which has each letter associated with a patch of colour:

                  

 

A very lively monogramme for ASHWOOD Natural Products of South Africa.
Design: Cecily Rocher.
                                           
 


 

This logo was designed by the Graphic Shop for a music shop at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. The rythm and verve of the lettering struck just the right chord with the illustration.

 

Branding for a "wickedly decadent" ice-cream shop; with Tan designs:

               

 

My aim here was to create something which looked personal, confident and stylish:

      

 

I cant remember who I did this for, or even what sort of business it was for!:

                       

 

Branding for a nutrition project in Kwazulu-Natal which encourages the the growing of certain vegetables. My aim was to portray health and growth. Art direction was by Trish Carey of the Medical Research Council:



Events, too, require branding. When I designed the the scroll presented to President Nelson Mandela in 1998, we used the lettering from the scroll on posters, banners, media communications and invitations. It was most unusual and effective:

                     See projects handled for my own clients in this field       Free Stuff